Molly Clark and the National Pioneer Women's Hall of Fame

By Dianna Newham (Curator, National Pioneer Women's Hall of Fame)

The National Pioneer Women’s Hall of Fame in Alice Springs was founded by a woman on the land, Molly Clark, and this is her story...

Molly Clark seated at the National Pioneer Women’s Hall of Fame at the Old Alice Springs Gaol in 2010, Photographer: Unknown, Source: Supplied: Dianna Newham

Molly Clark seated at the National Pioneer Women’s Hall of Fame at the Old Alice Springs Gaol in 2010, Photographer: Unknown, Source: Supplied: Dianna Newham

In 1955 Molly Clark arrived at the 3,410 square kilometre station at Andado, around 330 kilometres south-east of Alice Springs with her husband Mac and three small sons. Previously, the young family had been working on grazing properties between Broken Hill, Birdsville and Tennant Creek.  At Andado, they lived in the original 1920’s homestead for a few years, building a new one a few kilometres west. The old homestead was left to fall down, but in 1969 Molly decided to resurrect it and turn it into a homestay operation as an alternative income during drought years. The project took almost 20 years to fulfil during which time she physically worked on getting the building and surrounding area habitable. 

The 1970s witnessed a catalogue of personal crises: one son had a life-threatening accident; Molly's husband suffered a fatal heart attack after crash landing his light aircraft; and her eldest son was killed by a freight train whilst driving his prime mover across a railway line at night. By the end of the decade, Molly had also lost her livelihood, when the Northern Territory government were forced to destroy all her cattle following a brucellosis scare. Molly continued to work on her tourist venture – one of the first of its kind – at Old Andado, which was now her home. From the mid-1990s, she welcomed guests into her 1922 corrugated iron and timber home, set amongst alternate landscapes of flat gibber and giant sand dunes.

In 1993, Molly and supporters in Alice Springs established the National Pioneer Women’s Hall of Fame. In the late 1980’s, Molly had visited the now famous Stockman’s Hall of Fame and, in response, felt the need to establish a museum dedicated to commemorating the contribution and achievements of Australian women.  As Molly later said:

I was sick of seeing women forgotten while the men got all the praise.  I was backing my husband and I knew hundreds of other women who’d backed theirs all the way through but you never heard what Mrs So-and-so did, it was only what Mr So-and-so did.  Well, Mr So-and-so could not have done it without the backing of his wife…My dream is just to see that women were recognised.

Molly’s story is not unusual for the women of Central Australia, and many more of these stories are told in our exhibition, Women at the Heart. The work of local Arrernte and other Aboriginal women, and the friendships between these women and the newcomers is also recognised. Central Australia’s pioneering women, black and white, often transcended narrow, nationally endorsed stereotypes about women’s work. As many an early male commentator noted, the outback could not have been settled without them. In 1929, for example, John William Bleakley, the Chief Protector of Aborigines in Queensland, declared:

The lubra … one of the greatest pioneers of the Territories, for without her it would have been impossible for the white man to have carried on ...”

Display panel from the exhibition, Women at the Heart, National Pioneer Women's Hall of Fame.

Display panel from the exhibition, Women at the Heart, National Pioneer Women's Hall of Fame.

We also recognise Australian women on the land in our exhibition What’s Work Worth? The first objects displayed in this exhibition are a handful of wangurnu seeds (collected by Pulpuru Davies, Gibson Desert, Western Australia in mid-2000) lying on a grinding stone.  Aboriginal women throughout Central Australia and the Western Desert worked laboriously at the time-consuming task of finding, grinding and baking seed, and we open our exhibition by acknowledging this work.  It has, in fact, been argued that industrialised flour was integral to the colonisation of Central Australia.

"Flour" cluster, What's Work Worth? National Pioneer Women's Hall of Fame

"Flour" cluster, What's Work Worth? National Pioneer Women's Hall of Fame

We also reference the story of wool in Central Australia, in a cluster of objects which show shears, a washboard and an acetylene lamp.  Tom Roberts’ iconic Australian paintings and stories about the important role shearers’ strikes played in the establishment of the Australian Labor Party have masculinised our perceptions of shearing. Local history, however, tells another story. Outback women who spent years working on Centralia’s family owned pastoral properties, often did the shearing as well.   

"Wool" cluster, What's Work Worth? National Pioneer Women's Hall of Fame

"Wool" cluster, What's Work Worth? National Pioneer Women's Hall of Fame

Sheep shears also remind us of the cross-cultural dimensions of a sheep, rather than cattle-based, pastoral industry. Margaret Bain, who described herself as Centralia’s last missionary, was convinced that sheep were much more encouraging of a family centred Aboriginal nomadism than cattle. Sheep, unlike cattle, required close supervision. Local pastoralists, including the missionaries at Ernabella for whom Margaret worked, often employed Aboriginal women as shepherds. Shepherding enabled these Aboriginal women to travel through country with their children, hunting and gathering as they always had. It also enabled them to trade their work for highly prized European goods. 

The washboard was donated by Jean Weir (nee Chalmers) and was used on MacDonald Downs station in Central Australia.  Like many outback women, Jean Chalmers played an integral role in helping her family drive their 400 sheep, 13 horses and a few goats from the New South Wales-Queensland border to take up a pastoral lease in Central Australia in 1925. The washboard became obsolete when Jean acquired a pump up and down washing machine.

These are just some of the stories of Australian women on the land referenced in our museum.  The term “farmer” is not common usage in the Northern Territory and part of our role in the Invisible Farmer project is to bring in stories and perspectives from Central Australia, to show the truly national contribution of women on the land.

We are proud to be a partner in the Invisible Farmer project and look forward to working alongside Arrernte and other Aboriginal women to highlight Indigenous women’s current and future contribution to land management.  We will also develop new content relating to women on the land to add to our existing exhibitions and highlight the work of these women in our monthly oral history program, Stories from the Heart.  In closing we would like to pay homage to Molly Clark for establishing our museum, and enabling us to capture and celebrate the diversity of women's stories.

Want to know more?

Visit the National Pioneer Women's Hall of Fame website:
www.pioneerwomen.com.au

Follow the National Pioneer Women's Hall of Fame on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/NPWHF/

Farm to Farm: PhD student from Idaho, USA, Meets Women Farmers in Victoria, Australia

By Tagen Baker

As a visiting research associate for Museum Victoria, and a PhD student in Utah State University’s Department of Environment and Society, I had the opportunity to explore the diverse landscape of Victoria and interview and photograph women farmers—to learn from them about their histories, responses to climate change, and how they adapted their agricultural practices to sustain themselves and their families. I wanted to know how their experiences have been similar or different to women in my home state of Idaho, USA.  How have women been key agents of change embedded in their environments? How do women farmers provide unique perspectives and contributions to the futures of agriculture and to their communities?

Tagen Baker (PhD student from Idaho, USA) with Elizabeth Mace, Field Officer for G.V. Crop Protection, Goulburn Valley, 2016.

Tagen Baker (PhD student from Idaho, USA) with Elizabeth Mace, Field Officer for G.V. Crop Protection, Goulburn Valley, 2016.

As part of my research process, I asked women if I could photograph them with an item of value. This item opened up a unique opportunity to communicate and learn about the farmer’s lives. The item chosen was not only symbolic as a physical item of value, tangible and necessary, but a portal into a storytelling journey, a symbol of their rich and unique life experiences.

I interviewed, Brialey Brightwell, a berry farmer from Hoddles Creek who explained her item of value was her chainsaw:

 I find it quite important because I love getting wood for the fire, but I always had to be dependent on having a man with me who was going to cut the wood. When my husband bought me my chain saw, it meant I could go get wood without having to ask someone to come and help me. I like being independent.

While interviewing Brialey about her item of value, I learned that having wood burning fires in the home were part her family background and culture. She uses the firewood to heat her home, hot water for showers, and for cooking on the stove. Cutting wood from fallen trees on her property was also part of her daily work to maintain the farm.

Brialey Brightwell holding a chainsaw on her farm property, Nerrigundah Berries, Hoddles Creek, 2016, Source: Museums Victoria, Photographer: Tagen Baker.

Brialey Brightwell holding a chainsaw on her farm property, Nerrigundah Berries, Hoddles Creek, 2016, Source: Museums Victoria, Photographer: Tagen Baker.

In the agricultural sector in Victoria, there are many layers of knowledge and forward thinking required to sustain each farm. No farm has the exact same ecology. Similar to Idaho, there is great diversity in the types of crops that are grown and a long history of seasons of drought. All farms require water to survive. Climate change is a constant concern and requires the ability to manage timing and usage of water for the specific needs of each property and crop. In an interview with Elizabeth Mace, a Field Officer for G.V. Crop Protection, she discussed the change of irrigation practices over the last 20 years. At the beginning of her career, 70 percent of pear trees in the Goulburn Valley were flood irrigated. Since that time, many initiatives have been in place to help save water, such as micro sprinklers. She said, “It has made a big difference… you have to have diversity, to understand that water is precious and have to really time [irrigation] at the right time, not just flood irrigating every two weeks.”

Elizabeth Mace, Field Officer for G.V. Crop Protection, Goulburn Valley, 2016, Source: Museums Victoria, Photographer: Tagen Baker 

Elizabeth Mace, Field Officer for G.V. Crop Protection, Goulburn Valley, 2016, Source: Museums Victoria, Photographer: Tagen Baker 

Like farmers in Idaho, growers in Victoria have shifted irrigation practices to help conserve water as well as provide a more efficient options to support dynamic growing systems. As noted by Rien Silverstein, a horticultural farmer who chose two aerial photographs of their orchards in Tatura and Orville as her item of value:

 The photographs are very symbolic of the changes in the industry, and to come to terms with climate change affecting the micro-systems that are in the farm. In the photographs, you can actually see those changes to the farm, the first image looks like a patchwork of what you can actually do and the other one looks more like a very fine embroidery, because each tree is planted very close together now . . .  there is lot more science into growing fruit trees now.

The imagery showcased the changes in the technology, but also how women farmers are embedded in their environments, testing different types of technology and methods that best suit the agricultural processes of their farms.

Rien Silverstein sitting in front of aerial photographs of her pear and apple orchards in Tatura and Orrvale, 2016, Source: Museums Victoria, Photographer: Tagen Baker

Rien Silverstein sitting in front of aerial photographs of her pear and apple orchards in Tatura and Orrvale, 2016, Source: Museums Victoria, Photographer: Tagen Baker

Rien Silverstein standing in front of her orchard in Orvalle, 2016, Source: Museums Victoria, Photographer: Tagen Baker

Rien Silverstein standing in front of her orchard in Orvalle, 2016, Source: Museums Victoria, Photographer: Tagen Baker

Throughout my time in Victoria, a strong theme that emerged during the interview process was the support women offer to one another and the importance of neighbours and community. The nearest neighbour could be a fair distance away. However, friends and neighbours provide assistance and emotional support during times of crisis. Sarah Parker, a dairy farmer in the Shepparton area and current President of the Australian Women in Agriculture Inc, shared an experience she had when she first moved onto her farm in 2007, during one of the worst years of drought on record in the Goulburn Valley. Without the feed to support their dairy, they had to bring in hay:

We had fifteen loads, that’s fifteen trucks of hay delivered in one day and a rain storm hit. The hay was sitting upwards, not on its side. We had all this hay sitting on the front yard, along the road, and on the front paddock. The next thing we knew, we had four different neighbours arrive with tractors. We had only been their two or three months and they came and tipped the hay over.

Sarah noted there is a relationship of trust within the women’s agricultural community when it comes relying on friends and neighbours for help and insight. She and her friend and fellow dairy farmer Gemma Monk both expressed the importance of communication and having a stable network of support, in order to conduct business, manage upcoming weather to determine management aspects of the farm such as paddock rotation, and for emotional support. When asked to choose an object that signified their role on the farm, both Gemma and chose their phones, demonstrating the importance of connectivity and communication on the farm.

Sarah Parker of Glencliffe Agribusiness in Shepparton, 2016, Source: Museums Victoria, Photographer: Tagen Baker

Sarah Parker of Glencliffe Agribusiness in Shepparton, 2016, Source: Museums Victoria, Photographer: Tagen Baker

Sarah Parker and Gemma Monk holding their phones, Shepparton, 2016, Source: Museums Victoria, Photographer: Catherine Forge

Sarah Parker and Gemma Monk holding their phones, Shepparton, 2016, Source: Museums Victoria, Photographer: Catherine Forge

After completing my field trip to Victoria, it became evident the network of communication among women farmers is one of the most vital aspects for the successes of farms in Victoria. Information sharing is paramount to every aspect of managing a farm, and looking forward to sustainable futures. I am excited to be a contributor the The Invisible Farmer project, because it will be a nexus of information sharing, providing in-depth histories and stories, as well as strategies for securing a sustainable future for agriculture. The project will add another dimension of information sharing, as farmers all over the world will be able to access the stories and knowledgebase unique to Victoria and the women who live there. Although the stories will be distinctive to these women and their lives, threads of commonality will be evident across geographical and cultural boundaries.

Want to know more?

To find out more about the Project and visit Melbourne Museum's Collections:
http://collections.museumvictoria.com.au/articles/14480

To view Tagen's photography work, visit her Instagram page:
https://www.instagram.com/tagenjenphotography/

Amelia Bright of Amber Creek Farm, South Gippsland

By Catherine Forge (Curator, Invisible Farmer Project)

Amelia Bright with her daughter Hazel at Amber Creek Farm in Fish Creek. Photograph: Catherine Forge, Source: Museum Victoria, 2016.

Amelia Bright with her daughter Hazel at Amber Creek Farm in Fish Creek. Photograph: Catherine Forge, Source: Museum Victoria, 2016.

Industry: Pork - pasture raised Wessex Saddleback
Name of enterprise: Amber Creek Farm and Sawmill
Location: Fish Creek, South Gippsland, Victoria

Amelia's story:

Reflecting on why she became a farmer, 28-year-old Amelia Bright recalls that “I fell into farming by accident.” Amelia was living and working as a prosthetist in inner Melbourne before she decided to take the plunge at farming pigs with her husband Dan Bright in Fish Creek, South Gippsland. Both Amelia and Dan had grown up in South Gippsland, but Amelia didn’t meet Dan until much later in life and never imagined that she would one day return to her home region to join him in establishing a 165-acre pig farm specialising in high quality pasture raised pork!

Amelia and Dan started their farm on a block of land that Dan had purchased prior to meeting Amelia. This block of land had once been part of a dairy farm situated next door to where Dan had grown up, and as a child Dan had helped to clear away tea tree with his grandfather, and had watched the landscape be logged and cleared. For both Amelia and Dan, a strong motivating factor leading them into pig farming was a shared sense of connection to their home region of South Gippsland, along with a deep concern for the local environment:

We care about the environment we live in. It’s our responsibility to keep our waterways in the best possible condition and care for the soil and to fix any erosion that was here prior to us coming. It’s our responsibility, and it is part of the reason we farm.

Amelia and Dan have worked hard in the past seven years to revegetate their property with native plants and trees, strive towards a neutral pH soil balance, create compost locally from pig and cow manure and to follow zero waste and organic farming principles. Their hard work has paid off and the farm is now entirely off-grid and self-sustaining. In tandem with the pig farm Amelia and Dan also operate a sawmill that uses locally sourced salvaged timber and supplies the farm’s compost, firewood, animal bedding, shelters and pig ‘home pads’. Amelia is driven by the belief that ‘everyone who owns their own small patch of land needs to take responsibility for the path that the planet is heading.’

Amelia Bright feeding pigs on her property at Amber Creek Farm, Fish Creek, 2016. Source: Museum Victoria, Photograph: Catherine Forge.

Amelia Bright feeding pigs on her property at Amber Creek Farm, Fish Creek, 2016. Source: Museum Victoria, Photograph: Catherine Forge.

Animal welfare is also a high priority at Amber Creek Farm. According to Amelia: ‘we care how the animals are raised and what we’re eating… the pigs are sentient beings, they deserve to have a high quality life and to not be stressed for their whole lives’. The pigs at Amber Creek Farm live outdoors for the entirety of their lives and have unrestricted access to shelter, fresh water and wallows at all times. Unlike other commercial pig breeds, they do not have their tails docked or their noses ringed to prevent foraging, and are instead free to roam in the soil and graze on a diet that is rich in nutrients and free of chemicals, hormones, drugs or GMOs.

This kind of open range farming isn’t without its’ difficulties and learning curves, but Amelia believes that it results in happier pigs and a higher quality, better tasting meat. It also allows Amelia to be involved, hands-on, with every stage of the process. She feeds the pigs, transports them to the abattoirs and then helps the butcher cut and pack the meat before selling the pork direct to customers: ‘I’ve got complete control over what happens to that animal’s life from the time its’ born to the time I sell it.’

Selling high-quality pork to her customers gives Amelia great joy, but when asked about how she feels about the Australian pork industry, Amelia responded that there were some major problems within the industry. For Amelia, the most pressing concern is the confusion surrounding the industry’s current labelling standards and the associated difficulties that consumers face when trying to choose which pork to purchase:

Confusion between free range, bred free range, pasture raised, barn raised, sow stall, sow stall free… it’s all quite abstract and relatively easy to manipulate those terms. You can still be called “free range” but technically live in a shed. So a lot of the problem is around language and the consumers will need to drive what happens within that industry space.

Amelia’s advice to consumers is to get informed, to research the food that they consume and to ask questions of their food suppliers. ‘Ask questions to your butcher’, she suggests, ‘do your own quick research and make your own informed choices.’

Pigs foraging for food at Amber Creek Farm, Fish Creek, 2016. Source: Museums Victoria, Photograph: Catherine Forge

Pigs foraging for food at Amber Creek Farm, Fish Creek, 2016. Source: Museums Victoria, Photograph: Catherine Forge

Another way to stay connected to the food that you eat, argues Amelia, is to try to purchase locally grown produce where possible. Amber Creek Farm operates as an entirely local business servicing the South Gippsland region and providing pork directly to consumers via local farmer’s markets and through a small number of local produce outlets, with the occasional trip to Melbourne to hand-deliver orders in the inner-north. Most recently Amber Creek Farm has joined a local co-operative, Prom Coast Food Co-Op, that provides another mechanism for selling their meat locally.  ‘Know your farmer, know where your food comes from’ is Amber Creek Farm’s website motto, and Amelia believes strongly in the importance of staying connected to her customers and her local community. In fact, being connected to her local community is one of the major factors driving Amelia to farm:

We couldn’t run our business without the support of our local community. Our products are mostly sold within a 30-50km radius or less, and we’re able to do that because of the support of the community. By having a farm and being a farmer I get to be connected to our property and to our land and to our community. The connectedness I think overall is really important.
Amelia Bright holding her daughter Hazel, Amber Creek Farm, Fish Creek, 2016. Source: Museums Victoria, Photographer: Catherine Forge

Amelia Bright holding her daughter Hazel, Amber Creek Farm, Fish Creek, 2016. Source: Museums Victoria, Photographer: Catherine Forge

Amelia and Dan were married on their property in 2014 and have since had a young daughter Hazel. For Amelia, her daughter has grounded her to the farm in a way she never anticipated:

My daughter really embodies my whole farming journey, cementing my place here on the farm. Hazel was born at almost 43 weeks, so I was feeding pigs up until about 40 weeks with her, and from day dot… Hazel is part of our journey and part of caring for the land. She’s part of us, and she’s part of the farm.

Hazel and Amelia are joined at the hip most days, with Hazel travelling around the farm in a sling on Amelia’s back. ‘Most of the time she just pops on my back and away we go’, states Amelia, ‘I get to spend a lot of my day with Hazel whilst working, whereas not everyone can take their children to work with them.’ Hazel might still be a young toddler, but this doesn’t stop her from being incredibly active on the farm. She digs, she helps paint logs at the saw mill to stop them splitting, she empties the pig troughs and she travels to the farmers markets and butchers with Amelia. Amelia believes that this rural upbringing provides her daughter with a rich and diverse learning environment, and an innate understanding of where her food comes from:

It’s a brilliant education for her to see how food is produced and how animals and ecosystems interact with each other and the consequences of doing it properly, or having errors along the way. It’s a great way for her to learn, by having a visceral connection to the land and playing in creeks and bush and exploring.
Amelia Bright sitting with her daughter Hazel in a tractor, Amber Creek Farm, Fish Creek, 2016. Source: Museums Victoria, Photographer: Catherine Forge

Amelia Bright sitting with her daughter Hazel in a tractor, Amber Creek Farm, Fish Creek, 2016. Source: Museums Victoria, Photographer: Catherine Forge

Amelia also believes it’s important for her daughter to watch her mother work on the farm, and to learn that her opportunities are not limited by traditional gender norms or stereotypes:

We’d really like her to grow up really capable and to see that both Mum and Dad can wield a hammer, and so can she, which she likes doing. She has complete choice over what direction her life is going to go in, and as long as she’s capable and can build those skills now, she continues to have choice.

As a 28-year-old female farmer Amelia Bright looks to the future with cautious optimism, and holds hopes for a future where women like her daughter will have equal opportunities. However, when asked about the role that farming women play in current society she laments that some women’s roles continue to remain invisible in the public eye, perhaps due to the fact that they have contributed to the farm via an off-farm income, and perhaps because women are, quite simply, just too busy!

I think between helping on the farm, working on the farm or off the farm and doing the lion’s share of the domestic duties, there’s not a whole lot of time for self-amelioration of ‘wow, look what women are doing’! We’re too busy. We just get on with it.

Amelia reflects that farming can be difficult, overwhelming, time-consuming and financially challenging at times, however despite these factors she wouldn’t change a thing. When asked what she will be doing in ten years’ time, Amelia’s response comes quickly and with no hesitations: ‘We’re not going anywhere. We’ll be here.’

*All quotes and material taken from an interview between Catherine Forge and Amelia Bright, Fish Creek, 2016, Source and Copyright: Museums Victoria, Registration HT 49676.

Additional Images:

Want to know more?

You can stay in touch with Amelia's story, here:

Website: www.ambercreekfarm.com.au
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AmberCreekFarm
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ambercreekfarm

To find out more about the Project and visit Melbourne Museum's Collections:
http://collections.museumvictoria.com.au/articles/14480

PhD Scholarships on Invisible Farmer Project

The Invisible Farmer, funded as an ARC Linkage project, is the largest ever study of Australian women on the land. It will combine personal narratives and academic research to map the diverse, innovative and vital role of women in Australian agriculture. The project is based on a creative partnership between rural communities, academics, government and cultural organisations, and aims to:

  • Create new histories of rural Australia
  • Reveal the hidden stories of women on the land
  • Learn about the diverse, innovative and vital role of women in agriculture
  • Stimulate public discussions about contemporary issues facing rural Australia and its future
  • Develop significant public collections that will enable far reaching outcomes in research, industry and public policy

Funding is available for scholarships to support two postgraduate research projects. We are seeking expressions of interest from suitably qualified candidates who must be available to commence on 27 February 2017. Formal position descriptions and information on high to apply will be made available as soon as possible.

Postgraduate project 1: A history of the Australian Rural Women’s Movement in the late 20th century.

The successful candidate will conduct research that draws upon archival material created during previous studies to document the history of the Australian Rural Women’s Movement. They will also collect life history interviews to expand and develop existing collections. Using an innovative mix of oral history, digital technologies and material culture the candidate will contribute to the larger ARC funded project as it reframes the narrative of Australian history to highlight the role of women on the land.

The candidate’s research will be situated at the intersection of multiple fields: oral history and collecting/curating methodologies, gender/women’s studies, public policy, sociology, social and cultural informatics and digital humanities. They will be co-supervised by Professor Joy Damousi in the history programme in the School of Historical and Philosophical Studies at the University of Melbourne and Liza Dale-Hallet, Senior Curator, Museum Victoria

Candidates would be required to meet the entry requirements of a PhD – that is an honours degree (H2A and above) in History, or in related fields such as Gender studies, Heritage and Museum studies.

Candidates must be able to commence their enrolment on February 27, 2017.

Postgraduate project 2: An analysis of the contemporary position of Australian women in agriculture

The successful candidate will conduct research with rural women to understand the contemporary opportunities and limitations to women’s leadership in agriculture and the impacts of these on the health and sustainability of rural communities. The research will complement the history project and build on our understanding of the contributions of rural women. The candidate will add to previous studies of rurality and gender and conduct original interviews and focus groups. Using a mixed methodology the candidate will contribute to the larger ARC funded project as it reframes the narrative of Australian history to highlight the role of women on the land.

The candidate’s research will be situated at the intersection of multiple fields: sociology, social work, gender/women’s studies and social policy. They will receive targeted training in gender studies and feminist analysis. They will be co-supervised by Professor Margaret Alston at Monash University and a research focused member of the Victorian Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources (DEDJTR).

Candidates would be required to meet the entry requirements of a PhD – that is an honours degree (H2A and above) in Sociology or another related social science discipline.

Candidates are to commence their enrolment as early as possible in 2017.

Candidates interested in applying for either scholarship should forward their expressions of interest to Dr Nikki Henningham via email at n.henningham@unimelb.edu.au.

Expressions of interest should include:

  • clear identification of which scholarship the application wishes to apply for,
  • a 1-2 page document outlining formal qualifications, work experience and any other features that support the applicant’s suitability for candidature.
  • in the case of applicants for Scholarship 1, a statement indicating their availability to start on February 27, 2017. In the case for Scholarship 2, a statement indicating their earliest starting date.